Natwest launches biometric payment card trial using Fingerprint’s technology

As part of a national trial NatWest is piloting cutting edge, biometric fingerprint technology with 200 customers. The trial is due to begin in the coming weeks.

Customers will use their fingerprint to verify transactions over £30, increasing security and making it easier for customers when paying for goods or services at the tills as no PIN is required.

David Crawford, Head of Effortless Payments said: “We are using the very latest technology across our business to make banking easier for our customers and biometric fingerprint cards are one of the many technologies we are exploring further. This is the biggest development in card technology in recent years and we are excited to trial the service.”

NatWest is working closely with digital security company Gemalto along with Visa and Mastercard to bring the service to customers in the UK. Howard Berg, UK MD of Gemalto said: “Using a fingerprint rather than a PIN code to authorise transactions has many advantages, primarily enhanced security and greater convenience. Cardholders can pay quickly and easily with just a simple touch, and they no longer need to worry about the limit on contactless payment transactions.

The UK’s first biometric payment card trial is using Fingerprints’ T-shape sensor module and newly-announced software platform for payments. Its ultra-low power consumption means that the card does not need to feature a battery, as it borrows power from the contactless POS terminals, and superior biometric performance ensures both security and convenience for its user.

This is the first trial in the UK, the leading and pioneering market for contactless payments. As part of the trial, NatWest customers will be able to verify transactions above the £30 payment cap using their fingerprint instead of PIN code. Easy and secure.

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Categories: Biometrics, payment

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